hOW TO COOK YOUR GRASS FED BEEF

Grass fed beef can sometimes get a bad rap as a lean, tough beef. In reality, the beef simply cooks differently because of how the muscle and fat structure developed more slowly, in an active animal. Grass fed beef is just as tender and juicy, with twice as flavor depth when handled correctly. 


Let us help you cook the steak that will entirely 

change the way you think about beef.


Cooking Methods

We change up our cooking methods based on the cut, our mood, the season, or just for fun.. but in really its how much tome do I have and how many things did I forget to do today? For our grass fed beef I like to use an Instant Pot/ Pressure cooker or a Crock Pot for roasts and short ribs. My grandmother is a wonderfully old fashioned southern cook.. her cornbread and greens y’all OMG.. she can slow cook at perfect, fall apart roast in the oven. If the day ever comes that I figure that out I will promptly post a recipe or a video. For me, for now.. plug and go crock pot or Pressure Cooker it is. And for steaks and other grilling cuts I love the grill, the old fashioned cast iron skillet, or if I’m feeling extra foodie (and maybe a little lazy) I’ll bring out my Anova sous vide (more on that below).

Temperature and Done-ness Recommendation:

We recommend you cook tender cuts to Rare to Medium Rare which is between 120 – 135 degrees. For steak eaters that prefer their beef Well Done, y’all should cook your beef much slower and lower. Be kind to your beef.  The goal is to keep the muscle fibers from contracting so tightly during cooking that they push all their moisture out and can’t relax into a tender mouthful. The easiest way to prevent this is to extend your temperature curve following the process of frozen-cold-warm-hot-warm-rest-eat instead of simply frozen-cold-hot-eat.


First, let’s thaw the beef.. All of our beautiful beef comes vacuum sealed and frozen. Thaw the beef in cool water or in a dish in the refrigerator overnight. NEVER use a microwave to thaw your beef, it will affect the final texture of your steak.


Bring it up to room temperature and season...  We like to keep the seasoning simple. Course salt, ground pepper, and garlic. While you’re preparing, allow the meat to come to room temperature. Foodie lesson on when to salt the beef.. if you’ve got 40+ minutes you can pre-season your steak while bringing it to room temperature. If you’re cutting it close, simply season it just before going on the heat. Anything in between will pull moisture out of the steak without giving it time to reabsorb back into the meat, resulting in greater evaporation during cooking and a drier steak.


Cooking the Perfect Grass Fed Steak

  • First, Let's THAW the beef, All of our beautiful beef comes vacuum sealed and frozen. Thaw the beef in cool water or in a dish in the refrigerator overnight. NEVER use a microwave to thaw your beef, it will affect the final texture of your steak.
  • Bring it up to ROOM TEMPERATURE and SEASON... We like to keep the seasoning simple. Course salt, ground pepper, and garlic. While you’re preparing, allow the meat to come to room temperature. Foodie lesson on when to salt the beef.. if you’ve got 40+ minutes you can pre-season your steak while bringing it to room temperature. If you’re cutting it close, simply season it just before going on the heat. Anything in between will pull moisture out of the steak without giving it time to reabsorb back into the meat, resulting in greater evaporation during cooking and a drier steak.
  • PREHEAT.. Start the grill on medium high and warm it until it is hot. Use the hand test: the grate will be hot enough when you can hold your palm 3-4 inches above the metal for no more than three seconds. If you are using a gas grill, turn off all but one of the burners once it has come up to temperature. If you are using charcoal, let the coals die down a bit and rake all the coals to one side. With cast iron, heat to Medium-High for searing and add oil. When the oil is shimmering its time to add the steak.

  • To get a great SEAR and crust, pat the steaks very dry and sear for 2-3 minutes on each side directly over the flame, with the lid down.
  • Then, MOVE the steaks to the cooler side of the grill or turn the stove to medium-low.
  • Set the lid in place and allow the steaks to cook, FLIP them every 4-5 minutes, until they reach 120-135 degrees, about 10-20 minutes, depending on the size and thickness of the steak.
  • Use a digital thermometer to CHECK for done-ness and remember that steaks, especially larger ones, will continue to cook once removed from the grill increasing internal temperature another 3-5 degrees.
  • If cooking on the stove, a few minutes before the meat is done add a tablespoon of good salted butter to the pan to FINISH the steak. This step is optional but adds a beautiful creaminess and extra browning to the beef.Baste the steak with the butter as it melts.
  • REMOVE the steaks to a warm platter and allow them to REST for 5 minutes before serving.  The resting period allows the juices to redistribute through the meat as the fibers relax after cooking.

If you’re grilling a longer fiber-ed cut like a flank steak, skirt, sirloin flap, teres major, or even just a big ole share-size steak CARVING will be the final step before digging in and can make or break the eating experience. Make sure you’ve got a knife that is sharp and non- serrated, take a second to examine the cut to see which direction the fibers run and note if they change direction. For the most tender bite, follow the fibers and slice across their grain.


SLOW COOKIN’

For added oomph to your slow cooked feast here are some tips:

  • Brown that meat y’all! When the recipe says “brown the meat” it means BROWN👏🏼THAT👏🏼MEAT👏🏼Y’ALL👏🏼- Getting a good caramelization on the beef before slow or pressure cooking is the easiest way to get the perfect dish with a rich, dynamic flavor profile.Technically it’s called the Maillard Reaction, searing at high heat helps to create a finished dish with complex layers of nutty caramel and coffee-like bitterness that will make your taste buds SING.- I chopped my chuck roast into 4 large chunks to get a better sear and not crowd the pan too much. Over crowding the pan will steam the meat instead of sear.
  • Slightly wilt the onions and garlic until they become fragrant – we’re layering flavors
  • Deglaze your pan with red wine (my personal favorite) or beef stock and mix in a Tablespoon of cornstarch, flour, or arrowroot powder. This added step sounds fancy but its really just pouring liquid on the hot pan and scraping with a firm spatula. It will not only clean your browning pan but will add a rich depth of flavor and serve as a slight thickener to your final dish. You can thicken the gravy more later if you desire.
  • Add your veggies on top – like potatoes and carrots
  • Let it cook....
  • For a pressure cooker:
  • Stew meat or smaller pieces 45 minutes high pressure and natural release at least 20 minutes
  • Larger roasts go for 1hr 15min high pressure and natural release at least 20 minutes
  • For the slow cooker: 7-9 hours on low

 

For the Ultimate Pot Roast we suggest using our Chuck Roast (boneless or bone in), Rump, or Stew Meat If you like a leaner roast try the Sirloin Tip Roast or the Bottom Round!


Sous Vide

I love a steak, or anything really, cooked over open flames but sometimes I just don’t always have the time to commit to the beautiful hands on process that is grilling. So.. What the heck is a Sous Vide? 

Sous Vide is actually a cooking method invented by, you guessed it, the French! This method allows for strict temperature controls and perfectly cooked, edge to edge meat every time. You seal up your beef with some seasonings, herbs, a little butter in a plastic (or reusable silicone) bag and submerge it in the temperature controlled water bath for the desired time. For a 1 ½” ribeye cooked to medium rare, it would take about 1Hr 10Min set a 131*… quite a time investment for a steak but at least its hands off cooking and the steak is perfect every time. When you’re ready to eat, simple remove the steak from the bag, pat dry and sear on the skillet. 

Some of the primary benefits of using this cooking method with grass fed beef are by being sealed up, you don’t lose any of the flavorful juices during the cooking process. The gentle heating and cooking process doesn’t shock and contract the muscle fibers as they would on a hot fire. I use this method all the time for meal prep! I can add different seasonings to each bag, cook them all at once, store in the fridge, and do a quick sear when I’m ready to eat. Easy. I’m not a rep just a busy woman that loves to eat well prepared home cooked meals. Do some google research and maybe try it out.


However you choose to cook up your

grass fed, grass finished beef... 

We hope you and your family ENJOY!